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is standing pat at the white house to figure out just exactly what the movements are every day. dana bash is on capitol hill. dan, let me start with you. we were just hearing from the president and we were cut off by a nasty satellite. let me talk about these business people and what exactly they can bring to the table because it seems as though he's soliciting them for advice. >> reporter: he is. but at the same time, you brought up a good point, that the president really has been doing a lot of the pressure as opposed to sitting down with lawmakers face-to-face. he's using outside groups to put pressure on lawmakers. so he's had middle class americans here at the white house. he's had small business owners and big-time ceos at the white house and now he's reaching out to the business roundtable. many movers and shakers in the business community to make the case as a white house official that if -- without this fiscal cliff situation being resolved, it doesn't give the certainty that not only businesses need to start making investments, to hiring more people, but also middle class americ
on taxes and spending cuts? our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is up on capitol hill. what are you hearing, dana? >> reporter: the senate majority leader who told me he's one of the biggest pessimists says he thinks it's going to be very difficult to get a deal done by christmas. meanwhile, republicans don't have a lot of opposition to raising the tax rates tried a different tactic today. a new coordinated message from republicans searching for more secure political footing. mr. president, show us your cuts. >> where are the president's spending cuts? the longer the white house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> nobody should trust democrats to put a dime until real deficit reductions. >> reporter: to better understand the gop positioning, remember what any reduction deficit looks like drawn from two different pots of money. first, tax revenue. second, spending cuts likely to center on changes to entitlements like medicare. on revenues, republicans already conceded to tax increases for the wealthy. the big sticking point is what kin
dana bash is turning to more details now on what's apparently going wrong. what's the latest? >> reporter: a very interesting moment when the former democratic house speaker nancy pelosi had blunt advice for the current republican house speaker in terms of learning how to get his caucus together to find a deal that can actually pass congress and that the president will sign and those blunt words were, quote, figure it out. sources of both parties say a tuesday evening phone call between the president and speaker boehner did not go well. >> well, the president and i had a deliberate call yesterday and we spoke honestly and openly about the differences that we face. >> cnn has learned at least part of the reason why. tuesday's gop counteroffer included a renewed explicit call for a, quote, permanent extension of bush era tack cuts for the top 2% of americans. according to a democratic source familiar with the language. the democratic source argued that proposing to permanently extend tax cuts for the wealthy that the president calls a nonstarter shows that republicans are eithe
" in just a moment. first, let's get some background from our senior congressional correspondent dana bash joining us from capitol hill. i think it's fair to say, dana, all of us were stunned by this announcement today. >> reporter: that's right, wolf. well, senator demint had always said he was going to limit himself to two terms in the senate. but he's not even halfway through his second term and saying he's going to leave in january with almost four years left. i'm told he didn't tell his staff about his decision until this morning right before it was made public. but he said this was an offer to go to this conservative think tank he couldn't pass up. jim demint's announcement that he's leaving the senate was a stunner. >> i honestly believe i can do a lot more on the outside than i can on the inside. >> reporter: the anti-government, anti-tax conservative crusader certainly made a mark on the inside. on the senate floor, a frequent voice of objection against legislation backed by both parties. >> is there any objection? >> mr. president, i object. >> reporter: just this week he helped
congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not wednesday at noon. >> good morning. >> house republican leaders told members they're free to leave, because they have nothing to vote on. >> i understand that you are saying legislation has been put on the floor. when it comes to just pure optics of the house leaving with the fiscal cliff right in front of us -- >> i'll be here and i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious about solving this problem. >> in fact, sending lawmakers home is a way for house republicans to illustrate their current message, your move, mr. president. >> we need a response from the white house, we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> john boehner made a point at expressing dismay the president hasn't responded two
's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800 billion in new tax revenue. so there's certainly a lot of frustration. particularly right now on the side of republicans who understand that democrats have the leverage right now. but on friday, the speaker did do something that seemed to indicate a little bit of day light. and that is he declined to put a line in the sand on that big issue that divides the two parties, which is raising tax rates for the wealthiest americans. he was asked a number of times whether he's still sticking to that. he didn't say yes. instead, here's what he said. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his positio
potentially be very significant. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. >> reporter: reckless was the strong word the speaker used to describe timothy geithner's statement that he is willing to go over the cliff if republicans don't give on tax rates for the wealthy. i am told by a congressional source familiar with the talks they only had four, four staff level negotiations on the issue of the fiscal cliff, and that's why the speaker says the president is slow walking the issue. the house speaker ended the week with a progress report. none. >> when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> reporter: he and the president spoke by phone only once all week and it didn't produce much. >> just more of the same. it is time for the president if he's serious to come back with a counteroffer. >> reporter: what may have been most notable was what boehner did not say. he did not repeat his demand to keep tax cuts for the wealthy in place, the biggest issue that divides them. instead, when asked
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)